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Why Should A Muslim Woman Wear The Hijab?

lightofguidance:

1.You please Allah. You are obeying the commands of your Lord when you wear the hijaab and you can expect great rewards in return. 

2.It is Allah’s protection of your natural beauty. You are too precious to be ‘on display’ for each man to see. 

3.It is Allah’s preservation of your chastity. 

4.Allah purifies your heart and mind through the hijaab. 

5.Allah beautifies your inner and outer countenance with hijaab. Outwardly your hijaab reflects innocence, purity, modesty, shyness, serenity, contentment and obedience to your Lord. Inwardly you cultivate the same. 

6.Allah defines your femininity through the hijaab. You are a woman who respects her womanhood. Allah wants you to be respected by others, and for you to respect yourself. 

7.Allah raises your dignity through the hijaab. When a strange man looks at you, he respects you because he sees that you respect yourself. 

8.Allah protects your honour 100% through your hijaab. Men do not gaze at you in a sensual way, they do not approach you in a sensual way, and neither do they speak to you in a sensual way. Rather, a man holds you in high esteem and that is just by one glance at you! 

9.Allah gives you nobility through the hijaab. You are noble not degraded because you covered not naked. 

10.Allah demonstrates your equality as a Muslim woman through the hijaab. Your Lord bestows upon you equal worth as your male counterpart, and gives you a host of beautiful rights and liberties. You express your acceptance of these unique rights by putting on the hijaab. 

11.Allah defines your role as a Muslim woman through the hijaab. You are a someone with important duties. You are a reflection of a woman of action not idle pursuits. You display your sense of direction and purpose through your hijaab. You are someone that people take seriously. 

12.Allah expresses your independence through the hijaab. You are stating clearly that you are an obedient servant of the Greatest Master. You will obey no one else and follow no other way. You are not a slave to any man, nor a slave to any nation. You are free and independent from all man-made systems. 

13.Allah gives you the freedom of movement and expression through the hijaab. You are able to move about and communicate without fear of harassment. Your hijaab gives you a unique confidence. 

14.Allah wants others to treat you – a Muslim woman - with kindness. And the hijaab brings about the best treatment of men towards you. 

15.Allah wants your beauty to be preserved and saved for just one man to enjoy – your husband. 

16.Allah helps you to enjoy a successful marriage through wearing hijaab. Because you reserve your beauty for one man alone, your husband’s love for you increases, he cherishes you more, he respects you more and he honours you more. So your hijaab contributes to a successful and lasting marriage relationship. 

17.Allah brings about peace and stability in the society through the hijaab! Yes this is true! Men do not cause corruption by forming illegal relationships because you - the Muslim woman - calm their passions. When a man looks at you, he feels at ease, not tempted to fornicate.

historyofeurope:

Nell Gwyn, (1650-1687), mistress of King Charles II of England.

historyofeurope:

Nell Gwyn, (1650-1687), mistress of King Charles II of England.

mediumaevum:

On this day, 30th May 1431, Joan of Arc was burned at the stake.
Eyewitnesses described the scene of the execution by burning on 30 May 1431. Tied to a tall pillar in the Vieux-Marché in Rouen, she asked two of the clergy, Fr Martin Ladvenu and Fr Isambart de la Pierre, to hold a crucifix before her. A peasant also constructed a small cross which she put in the front of her dress. After she expired, the English raked back the coals to expose her charred body so that no one could claim she had escaped alive, then burned the body twice more to reduce it to ashes and prevent any collection of relics. They cast her remains into the Seine. The executioner, Geoffroy Therage, later stated that he “…greatly feared to be damned.”

mediumaevum:

On this day, 30th May 1431, Joan of Arc was burned at the stake.

Eyewitnesses described the scene of the execution by burning on 30 May 1431. Tied to a tall pillar in the Vieux-Marché in Rouen, she asked two of the clergy, Fr Martin Ladvenu and Fr Isambart de la Pierre, to hold a crucifix before her. A peasant also constructed a small cross which she put in the front of her dress. After she expired, the English raked back the coals to expose her charred body so that no one could claim she had escaped alive, then burned the body twice more to reduce it to ashes and prevent any collection of relics. They cast her remains into the Seine. The executioner, Geoffroy Therage, later stated that he “…greatly feared to be damned.”

(via historyofeurope)

britishhistory:

On this day in 1937 the Duke of Windsor wed Wallis Simpson, an American divorcee. He had abdicated the British throne on December 10, 1936 so that he could do so.

britishhistory:

On this day in 1937 the Duke of Windsor wed Wallis Simpson, an American divorcee. He had abdicated the British throne on December 10, 1936 so that he could do so.

(via historyofeurope)

historyofeurope:

Maria Feodorovna (1759 - 1828) was the wife of Tsar Paul I of Russia and mother of both Tsar Alexander I and Tsar Nicholas I.

historyofeurope:

Maria Feodorovna (1759 - 1828) was the wife of Tsar Paul I of Russia and mother of both Tsar Alexander I and Tsar Nicholas I.

historyofeurope:

Henrietta Maria of France, wife of King Charles I of England.

historyofeurope:

Henrietta Maria of France, wife of King Charles I of England.

historyofeurope:

Maria Theresa reigned as Archduchess of Austria, Queen of Hungary & Croatia, and Queen Consort of the Holy Roman Empire from September 1745 – August 1765.

historyofeurope:

Maria Theresa reigned as Archduchess of Austria, Queen of Hungary & Croatia, and Queen Consort of the Holy Roman Empire from September 1745 – August 1765.

historyofeurope:

Lola Montez was the mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria and inspired him to abdicate his throne in 1848.

historyofeurope:

Lola Montez was the mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria and inspired him to abdicate his throne in 1848.

historyofeurope:

Isabella of France, (c.1295-1358), Queen Consort of King Edward II of England. Also known as the She-wolf of France, she and her lover, Roger Mortimer, orchestrated in 1326 the first successful invasion of England since the Norman invasion of 1066, deposing her husband and installing her son, now Edward III, in his place with Isabella as regent.
According to legend, she then proceeded to have her husband murdered by having him suffocated while a hot poker was inserted into his intestines…but there is no evidence of this ever actually happening.

historyofeurope:

Isabella of France, (c.1295-1358), Queen Consort of King Edward II of England. Also known as the She-wolf of France, she and her lover, Roger Mortimer, orchestrated in 1326 the first successful invasion of England since the Norman invasion of 1066, deposing her husband and installing her son, now Edward III, in his place with Isabella as regent.

According to legend, she then proceeded to have her husband murdered by having him suffocated while a hot poker was inserted into his intestines…but there is no evidence of this ever actually happening.

starlessandfeatherless:

Happy birthday, Mary I!
“Bloody” Mary, Queen Regnant of England and Ireland, was born on 18th February 1516 to Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. By the age of nine, she could read and write in Latin; she studied Greek, music and dance, having entertained a visiting French delegation on the harpsichord at age four. As her parents’ marriage broke down, Mary suffered from frequent periods of illness, encompassing depression and irregular menstruation, and was not permitted to see her mother. When Henry married Anne Boleyn, and the Princess Elizabeth was born, Mary’s parents’ marriage was declared void, and Mary herself was deemed illegitimate: thus, she was demoted from princess and styled instead the Lady Mary, and her place in the line of succession was instead passed to her half-sister. She was expelled from her court, and commanded to serve as a Lady In Waiting for Elizabeth.
After the execution of Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth too lost her place in the line of succession; Henry’s third wife, Jane Seymour, the mother of his eventual son, urged Henry to make peace with Mary. In making peace with her father, Mary was ordered to sign a declaration, acknowledging him as the Head of the Church. Eventually, Henry signed both of his daughters back into the line of succession before his death in 1547; his third child and only son, Edward, took the crown, guided by John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, and England was ruled in accordance with Henry’s Protestantism.
In July 1553, aged just 15, Edward VI died. Not wanting to hand the crown back to Catholic rule, Dudley instead passed the crown to Lady Jane Grey, Henry VIII’s great-niece. Mary saw Jane as simply a pawn in Dudley’s scheme - and, on 3rd August, road into London to waves of support. Dudley was charged with treason; he and Grey would eventually be imprisoned in the Tower of London. On 1st October 1553, Mary was formally crowned Queen at Westminster Abbey, and a new era began. A Catholic, she embraced her faith - and insisted that her country did so as well. Protestant leaders were executed: burned at the stake; decaptiated; killed brutally as Mary triumphed in the power she had longed for her entire life.
On 17th November 1558, Mary succumed to a long, painful illness, possibly ovarian cancer. Her Spanish husband Philip was in Brussels at the time; Mary had been unable to produce an heir, despite an overwhelming desire and several phantom pregnancies, and thus rule passed instead to her sister, Elizabeth. The childless, infamous half-sisters would eventually share a Westminster Abbey tomb.
When his eldest daughter had been a young child, Henry VIII was heard to boast to a visiting Venetian ambassador of Mary, “This girl never cries.”
Today, she would have turned 495.

starlessandfeatherless:

Happy birthday, Mary I!

“Bloody” Mary, Queen Regnant of England and Ireland, was born on 18th February 1516 to Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. By the age of nine, she could read and write in Latin; she studied Greek, music and dance, having entertained a visiting French delegation on the harpsichord at age four. As her parents’ marriage broke down, Mary suffered from frequent periods of illness, encompassing depression and irregular menstruation, and was not permitted to see her mother. When Henry married Anne Boleyn, and the Princess Elizabeth was born, Mary’s parents’ marriage was declared void, and Mary herself was deemed illegitimate: thus, she was demoted from princess and styled instead the Lady Mary, and her place in the line of succession was instead passed to her half-sister. She was expelled from her court, and commanded to serve as a Lady In Waiting for Elizabeth.

After the execution of Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth too lost her place in the line of succession; Henry’s third wife, Jane Seymour, the mother of his eventual son, urged Henry to make peace with Mary. In making peace with her father, Mary was ordered to sign a declaration, acknowledging him as the Head of the Church. Eventually, Henry signed both of his daughters back into the line of succession before his death in 1547; his third child and only son, Edward, took the crown, guided by John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, and England was ruled in accordance with Henry’s Protestantism.

In July 1553, aged just 15, Edward VI died. Not wanting to hand the crown back to Catholic rule, Dudley instead passed the crown to Lady Jane Grey, Henry VIII’s great-niece. Mary saw Jane as simply a pawn in Dudley’s scheme - and, on 3rd August, road into London to waves of support. Dudley was charged with treason; he and Grey would eventually be imprisoned in the Tower of London. On 1st October 1553, Mary was formally crowned Queen at Westminster Abbey, and a new era began. A Catholic, she embraced her faith - and insisted that her country did so as well. Protestant leaders were executed: burned at the stake; decaptiated; killed brutally as Mary triumphed in the power she had longed for her entire life.

On 17th November 1558, Mary succumed to a long, painful illness, possibly ovarian cancer. Her Spanish husband Philip was in Brussels at the time; Mary had been unable to produce an heir, despite an overwhelming desire and several phantom pregnancies, and thus rule passed instead to her sister, Elizabeth. The childless, infamous half-sisters would eventually share a Westminster Abbey tomb.

When his eldest daughter had been a young child, Henry VIII was heard to boast to a visiting Venetian ambassador of Mary, “This girl never cries.”

Today, she would have turned 495.

(via historyofeurope)